What do you Need to Succeed?

Archive for the ‘recovery’ Category

The Coaching Through Chaos Podcast – Check it out!

 

Coaching Through Chaos Podcast

 

 

I launched the Coaching Through Chaos Podcast – Bringing You what you need to Succeed in June on CoachingThroughChaos.com and on Bloomberg Radio 1110AM KTEK Houston’s Priceofbusiness.com.

The show is designed to bring you information and resources to empower you, educate you and enhance your life.  Once a month I’m going to a feature a resource specific for our Veterans and their families.  The episodes are 30 minutes long & launch each Tuesday along with an article on the subject on CoachingThroughChaos.com.

Guest line up so far:

Dr. Mark Wiederhold of the Virtual Reality Medical Center

Dr. Harry Haroutunian, the Physician Director of the Betty Ford Center

Darlene Lancer, LMFT, author of “Codependency for Dummies

Ret. Detective Mike Proctor, expert/author of “Antidote for a Stalker

Andrew Chang, Managing Partner of Eastern Foundry talking about their Foundry Cup competition for new tech to help our veterans with PTSD

Amy Morin, LCSW, best-selling author of “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

Jeff Motske, CFP, radio host & author of “The Couples Guide to Financial Compatibility

Melanie Notkin, best-selling author,entrepreneur talking about her book, “Otherhood“.

Stewart Levine, expert/author of “Getting to Resolution

Sasha Ginsberg, LCSW talking about mental wellness treatment at Westside DBT.

Shelly Davidescu, LMFT, therapist and entrepreneur talking about her Clean Forks program for female entrepreneurs.

Vahakn Matossian talking about the developments at HumanInstruments.co.uk and how they are making a difference in physically-challenged musicians lives.

The developers of the PocketLabApp bringing new ways for therapists to help their clients through their iphone.

 

If you want to follow me between episodes, please sign up for my mailing list at CoachingThroughChaos.com/podcast.  As a thank you for signing up, you’ll receive a FREE download of my ebook, “5 Ways: 100 Tips for Living a Happier, Healthier Life“.

If you have  ideas for guests, or if there’s a guest you’d like to hear from, let me know. I’m happy to take your suggestions.

If you know someone who continues to struggle with the same emotional mistakes over and over – whether it’s work, relationship or addiction problems, or depression, anxiety or past trauma gets in the way of them living a more fulfilling life, please send them the link to CoachingThroughChaos.com – we’d like to help 🙂

Colleen Mullen, Psy.D., LMFT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Sometimes we just need to be alone. It’s O.K. :)

Red Rock Blog post

I went hiking the other day at Red Rock Canyon during a weekend away visiting friends in Las Vegas. One of my favorite things to do is to go hiking by myself. It makes me feel at peace, I feel more centered, and I end up feeling like I listened to my own need for silent connection with nature.

It was while on this hike, that I got reminded that our society tells us it’s not O.K. to do things alone. Being that I am a therapist/coach by profession and I live with my husband and several animals, I rarely get time alone. This weekend away was to celebrate a friend’s birthday. I arrived in Las Vegas on Friday and met up with said friend and family. On Saturday morning I wanted to get out a do a decent-length quiet hike before all the birthday festivities began  – I was looking forward to taking in the desert air and scenery. The Red Rock Canyon has a 13-mile through road which has multiple trail heads along it. I purposely went to the visitor center to find out which trails may be less populated. I was instructed to head out to Ice Box Canyon trail head about 8 miles up the road. As I drove father away from the visitor center, I did find that the parking lots at the trail heads were less populated. I was excited to think I may be heading to one where I really could feel somewhat isolated.

According to the visitor guide, the hike was to take about 2.5 hours and be of “moderate” difficulty. Sounded great to me! I had water and a charged up phone packed in my bag. I was ready to go! I was about 20 minutes into the hike when I came across a group of people who were on their way back to the trailhead. I said, “Hello”, in passing and moved out of the way for the group to get past me. One of the ladies asked me, “Are you by yourself?” When I told her I was, she let out a sympathetic, “Awwww!” I let her know I was out there alone by choice and was enjoying the quiet and continued on with my hike. About another 20 minutes pass by and I get to a section of the trail with some more difficult rocks to step/climb up and over. I ran into a party of 3 at this juncture. Again, one of the ladies in the group commented to me during a quick verbal exchange, “I wouldn’t come out here alone”. I again, assured her I actually looked forward to this experience and went about my business. It was about 10 minutes later that I came across some rocks that I did not want to venture up and over without help, so I turned around at that point and began my hike back to the starting point.

Both of these exchanges had me thinking as I hiked about our society’s attitudes about being alone. I be no means am a “loner” or even an “introvert”. In fact, I love social interaction and get plenty of it. I do however, enjoy some quiet times alone. Exercise is one of my regular ways to get that fill and when I have time, I love to find local hikes to try by myself. As a therapist, I talk frequently with my clients about finding time for themselves, often framed as “self-care” time. I explore with my clients ways in which they can take some time alone to regroup and touch base with themselves. For some, this can be finding time for a 5-minute mediation in the morning, or carving out 15 minutes during their work day to break away from all the “noise”. On bigger levels, I help them discover what their needs are for personal time alone from others and help them plan that into their life. I think people understand that concept of “me time” or even “self-care” time, but I think something shifts when people think about doing activities alone. I also enjoy beaches, coffee houses (for quiet people-watching) and movies alone, but exercise feeds a lot of my emotional and spiritual needs so I tend to engage in that more frequently. For some, the 2 hour hike I embark on may be the equivalent of getting a massage and their nails done. Which, I assume if the same woman who gave me the sympathetic “Awwww!” in passing on the trail had actually crossed my path at the massage appointment; I don’t think she would have asked me why I went there alone. 

Do you listen to your need for quiet when it calls? How do you connect with yourself when you need to? Feel free to leave a comment! I’d love to hear about what you do when you need to be alone.
P.S. I recognize that hiking alone can be dangerous. Please note that I take appropriate precautions, but I try not to live my life from a fear-driven perspective. No therapists were injured in the data-collection of this blog post 

CoachingThroughChaos.com Motivation, Achievement and Recovery Coaching

Psychotherapy and Coaching in San Diego, CA.

Colleen Mullen, Psy.D. LMFT

Motivation, Achievement and Recovery

Motivation Achievement Recovery

The work I do with my clients focuses on Motivation, Achievement and Recovery aspects of their lives.  I thought I would take a minute to explain this.

If you were to come to me with a change you want to make, the first place I’d start with you is assessing your Motivation to change.  You have already sought out my services, so you are aware of what you want, but you haven’t yet been able to put any action into your change. I will assess and guide you through mindfully identifying and working through your obstacles to action until you are ready to put the change in motion.

The Achievement aspect of my work focuses on helping you design realistic and attainable short-term goals in addition to more grandiose long-term goals.  These goals will be measurable and designed to keep you motivated.

Recovery means a lot of things to a lot of people.  Traditionally, recovery refers to persons “in recovery” from addictions.  Yes, I do a lot of addiction recovery work with my clients, however, the term recovery can also mean recovery from a trauma, recovery from a relationship break-up, or recovering from some other type of loss.  Very often, we don’t realize just how much emotional stress we carry around everyday which can block us in the area of motivation by way of emotional obstacles we need to overcome.

I see motivation, achievement and recovery as a cumulative work process.  If one does not recover adequately from traumas. break-ups, addictions or what have you, there will most likely be motivational blocks in the form of emotional obstacles (apathy, depression, panic or anxiety,etc.) which will leave you struggling to achieve the changes you wish to implement in your life.

If this connects with you and you’d like to find out more, please contact me through my website: CoachingThroughChaos.com or call me at (619) 702-5571.

Please share this post with anyone you think may benefit from my services.  Thank you!

Best wishes for success!

Dr. Colleen Mullen, Psy.D., LMFT

Drug Court Participant Reflects on Life-Changing Program

While I was collecting my intern hours for my state licensure as a Marriage & Family Therapist, I worked in an incarceration-diversion program.  As with any recovery programs, there is mixed participation from the clients, but it was there that I developed a love for working with people who truly wanted to kick their addictions.!

This article is a reflection piece of a one such participant.

If you would like more information on kicking your habit, I’m happy to talk with you! Email me through my website CoachingThroughChaos.com

http://www.rexburgstandardjournal.com/news/drug-court-participant-reflects-on-life-changing-program/article_9abcbcc6-7fd3-11e4-8143-db6af56d8884.html

Who gets to claim they are “in recovery”

For those working in the field or dealing with their own or someone else’s ventures in recovery from addiction, this is an interesting read.  Words have so much meaning  –  this poses some thoughts on how or why we would describe someone as “in recovery”.

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=http://www.psmag.com/navigation/health-and-behavior/its-time-to-reclaim-the-word-recovery-addiction-treatment-12-step-programs-96037/&ct=ga&cd=CAEYACoTMjU0NDkyNTk3MzU2Mzc4NTk3MDIaMGJmZmQ2NGJkNTVkZWRmOTpjb206ZW46VVM&usg=AFQjCNFaN3FT9rAhaFoAwIz2dus3LapzUQ

time to reclaim recovery

A Step in the Right Direction for Veterans

Timely article relaying news of a new SAMHSA grant in Wisconsin to help the homeless veteran population there.  Of note is that they are estimating that 50% of those vets have a mental health diagnosis (think: ptsd, anxiety, depression) and up to 70% of them are expected to have a substance abuse problem at sometime in their future.  These numbers should not be thought of as particular to this area of the country.  All of our veterans need access to services that can help them recover from traumas (sights, sounds and injuries) when necessary and re-adjust to life outside of the military.  Glad to see SAMHSA is putting some money in the right place!

Homeless Vets in Northern Wisc. to get outreach & recovery help